Tag Archives: healthcare

Buyer Beware: How Patients are Negatively Impacted by the Changing Landscape of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)

As the Obamacare machine continues to grind forward, many patients have re enrolled in a second year of coverage. While most have not had to use their insurance (the young and healthy crowd) others have found their newly minted coverage to be far less than promised. High deductibles, and up front out of pocket expenses, forced many covered by the exchanges to avoid seeking regular preventative care—Prevention was one of then tenets of the ACA plan. Many have found choices limited and have been forced into healthcare systems that are not their first choice.

Now, as the second year of enrollment (and re-enrollment) has concluded, many of us are concerned about the likelihood of rate hikes and changes in coverage. The Obama administration continues to tout the fact that enrollment numbers remain high and that there have been no substantial increases in premiums. However, this is not necessarily the case. Many exchange insurers have cleverly disguised rate hikes through changes in other aspects of the plans. While some advertise that there are absolutely no significant premium increases, customers who shopped carefully on the exchange site were able to find higher prices for Emergency Room visits, and higher charges for non generic drugs. For some plans this means that rather than pay a $250 co-pay for an Emergency Room visit, the customer must pay up to the yearly deductible for the same ER visit before the co-pay rules go into affect. For many, this may be a non-starter. ER visits can be very expensive and can amount to thousands of dollars in just a few hours. Many patients will find themselves having to pay a 3-6 thousand dollar deductible early in the insured year before any of the benefits begin to contribute to reduce individual out of pocket costs. In some plans, the co-payment for a routine physician visit will go down by an average of 20 dollars and many generic drugs will be covered for free. However, specialty visit co-pays will increase and the prices for specialty medications will increase by 40-50%

In an effort to promote re-enrollment in 2015, the government implemented an automatic re-enrollment system. However, this has left many patients with increasing out of pocket costs due to the fact that multiple changes have been made—such as those described above. Many patients were unaware of the need to shop around for re enrollment and are now increasingly unhappy with their plans. Ultimately the ACA and its supporters in Washington have placed statistics and politics ahead of the patient. While the delivery of quality care to the patients who need it SHOULD be the goal, it appears that politics remains the top priority. Increasing out of pocket costs and higher deductibles—many requiring payment in the first half of the year—are having the opposite affect. One of the central tenets of the ACA is to focus on prevention through promoting regular access to primary care physicians for prevention of chronic disease and its complications.   However, rather than promoting and environment where patients are engaged and actively seek preventative care, many are using the insurance simply as a “disaster plan” simply due to the overwhelming costs. While out of pocket limits and guaranteed care consume the healthcare reform talking points of the Obama administration, the reality is that the way in which the ACA is structured and implemented has actually increased personal financial burden for many.

What Can Patients Do?

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Unfortunately, much of the burden of navigating the new healthcare landscape falls to the patient. The Law itself remains a moving target—with changes certain on the horizon. We must remember that insurers are for profit entities and will ultimately find a way to make a profit—often at the taxpayer and patient expense. While many have been encouraged by the Obama administration to continue to offer affordable premiums, most have found other ways to improve their revenue streams. Whether it is thru juggling co-payments and charges, shifting cost, denying procedure approval or limiting choice, all of these changes will–in the end—negatively impact patients. As a healthcare provider, my job is to educate patients about behaviors that may improve their overall health. Now with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, this responsibility now extends to helping my patients manage their insurance choices. While this is not necessarily a traditional role of a physician, it is important that we make sure that our patients continue to have access to the care they need—without incurring a life altering expense.

There are a few things that I think that patients can do to actively advocate for themselves and others:

  1. Stay Informed: Make sure that you ask questions of your insurer—are their changes to my coverage? How are out of pocket expenses handled? Can I see my doctor and my specialist when I want or need to without incurring a penalty or increased cost?
  2. Shop Around: Just because you have had coverage with a particular company in the past does not mean that you have to remain locked in with them. Make sure you explore all of the options that are available to you through the exchanges. Carefully question insurance company representatives so that you completely understand policies BEFORE you agree to a contract
  3. Demand Transparency: If you are unable to get a clear answer from an insurer about costs and coverage BEFORE you sign up, it is very unlikely that you will get a clear answer once you are a customer. Once you are a customer, make sure that you have a clear idea of the costs involved prior to scheduling a procedure or test. A recent survey sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson foundation found that nearly 56% of Americans get out of pocket cost information before accessing healthcare services.

As with most things that have occurred with the Affordable Care Act, it is the patient who ultimately suffers. Insurers continue to profit, as do drug makers and hospital systems and administrators. Physicians have seen reimbursement cut to levels that have forced integration with large hospital systems. Most tragically, however, patients tend to be caught in the middle and have seen their healthcare suffer. Surveys indicate that patients are now inquiring as to cost prior to office visits, tests and procedures. Many find that they must put off necessary preventative activities and even more opt not to have needed tests and therapeutic procedures due to cost. It is clear that the ACA has missed its mark. While insuring large numbers of Americans is a noble goal, this insurance must also provide value rather than meaningless statistics to be utilized at a White House press briefing. As my research mentors at Duke University taught me during my training–with any data analysis, it remains that garbage will equal garbage out. WE must find a better way to provide affordable care to our patients. For now, insurers, hospital systems and politicians are using patients as nothing more than a “Profit Center”. As reenrollment continues through this year and the next we must make sure that our patients are armed with the old adage—“Buyer Beware”

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Healthcare Industry CEOs and the Cost of Care: Too Many Men (and Women) in Black (Suits)?

Healthcare reform is a reality.  The ACA and its associated mandates have forever changed the landscape of medicine in the US today.  The Obama administration touts the goals of reform as providing affordable, cost effective, high quality care for all Americans.  Certainly these are noble and lofty goals–but have we completely missed the mark?  Today, many remain uninsured and the majority that have signed up for the exchanges are simply those who have lost their healthcare coverage from other providers.  Healthcare costs in the US remain above those of all other industrialized countries while physician salaries in the US continue to fall.  Even though the US spends more dollars per capita on healthcare than any other country on earth, our outcomes, when compared to other nations,  remain mediocre at best.

What about cost?  Who is actually delivering care?

Over the last 30 years, hospital administrators and CEOs have grown by 2500% while physicians have grown by only a modest amount.  In fact, according to the American Academy of Family Practice, there must be a 25% increase in primary care doctors over the next 10 years in order to keep pace with demand.  Multiple independent surveys (published by the AAMC) indicate a significant shortfall of all types of physicians nationally by the year 2020.  As administrators and insurance company executives grow, hospital staff and services continue to be cut—nurses and doctors are asked to care for more patients with fewer resources.  Executives continue to tout savings within their organizations and boards award these administrators with enormous financial bonuses.

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Source :  BLS and Hammelstein/Wool handler

Where are the Doctors in all of this?

The short answer is that physicians are caring for patients and managing the piles of paperwork that the government and other healthcare organizations and executives have created for them.  Doctors are now consumed with checking boxes, implementing EMRs and transitioning to a new coding system for billing—all while seeing increasing patient loads and meeting increasingly steep clinical demands.

This week in the New York Times, Elisabeth Rosenthal penned an article that spells out what many physicians have known for a very long time—the administrators and hospitals are the high wage earners–not the doctors.  As the numbers of administrators continues to rise exponentially, many independent physicians and physician groups are being driven to integrate with or leave practice altogether in order to remain fiscally viable.  According the the Times, the salaries of many administrators and CEOs (in both the hospitals and the insurance industry) are outpacing salaries of both general practice physicians, surgeons and even most specialists.  Astronomical wages such as those earned by Aetna’s CEO (total package over 36 million dollars) and others are a big contributing factor to the trillions of dollars that we spend on healthcare each year.  According to the New York Times, healthcare administrative costs make up nearly 30% of the total US healthcare bill.  Obviously, large corporations and CEOs will argue that these wages are necessary to attract the best and brightest executives to the healthcare industry.  What is there to attract the best and brightest scientists to medicine?  Certainly altruism is a big part of what physicians are about but economic realities must still come into play when bright young students are choosing careers (while accumulating graduate and professional school debt at record paces).

Why then does it seem as though physicians are the only target for reform?

That answer is simple–hospital administrators and insurance company CEOs are well trained businessmen (and women) with MBAs from prestigious schools.  They understand politics and how to effectively lobby.  They have been actively involved in reform and have participated in discussions on Capitol Hill rather than watch the change happen around them.  When costs are cut from the healthcare expenditures, they have made erudite moves–they have worked effectively to isolate themselves and their institutions from the cuts that are affecting the rest of the industry.   While reimbursement for office visits and procedures falls to less than 50% through many of the exchanges and other government based programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, CEOs and hospital administrators continue to financially outpace their colleagues in other sectors of business.

As physicians, we must continue to focus on our patients and their well being.  Individually, we must continue to provide outstanding, efficient, quality care to those who depend on us every single day.  As a group, however, doctors must begin to work harder to influence those in Washington for change.  While healthcare reform is essential and must be accomplished in a fiscally responsible way, it is my hope that those in a position to effect change will recognize that we must begin to better regulate and limit those in CEO and administrative positions in both the insurance and hospital industries.  Just as we reduce the numbers of nurses on the floor to care for patients in order to save healthcare dollars, maybe we should eliminate a few VPs with fancy offices on the top floors of our hospitals.  Which one do you think will positively impact patients more–fewer nurses or fewer dark suits?

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The Next Government-Based Healthcare Debacle: Coding for Orca Bites?

Due to the ineptness of the Obamacare team and the debacle that has ensued, the botched rollout of the Affordable Care Act has dominated the political and medical headlines since October.  However, other healthcare changes are on the horizon (and have gone virtually unnoticed by the public) that have the potential to further disrupt our ability to treat patients.  In fact, the technical and time consuming aspects of these new government mandated changes for 2014 may result in even larger scale computer glitches than those seen with the infamous Obamacare website.  (if you can believe that).  This week in the New York Times, author Andrew Pollack describes a new government medical coding system that must be implemented in 2014.

For decades the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has established billing codes for documentation and reimbursement purposes.  These codes are created by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the purposes of standardizing diagnoses in order to track diseases throughout the world–it allows for comparative study.  However, several governments (such as the US, France, Germany, Canada, and others) have long adopted these codes as a way to standardize billing for medical procedures.  These codes have long fallen short of specifically describing what is actually going on with the patient and have led to difficulties in accurately charging for medical services and procedures.  In brilliant fashion, there is now a new iteration of the coding system known as ICD-10 that will be mandated by the US government effective this fall.   Luckily, there are now codes for injuries that occur while skiing on waterskis that are on fire as well as codes for orca bites.  As you may imagine, these codes will certainly streamline my ability to treat my patients with these very very common ailments.

So why is it that our government and its agencies think that there administrators are well qualified to develop codes for medical diagnoses?  How is it that bizarre codes for humorous and extremely unlikely scenarios are being included and programmed into the system?  

If you ask CMS administrators, they will tell you that these new codes were adopted by the US government after careful consultation with coding experts, CMS administrators and physician advisors.  However, I am not exactly sure which physicians were involved in signing off on codes for “balloon accidents”, “spacecraft crash injuries” and “injuries associated with a prolonged stay in a weightless environment”.  The issue at hand is the fact that government is once again working to regulate situations and concepts that they do not understand.  Moreover, they mandate changes without adequate input from experts in the field in which they plan to regulate (such as physicians…)

What are the ramifications of ICD-10 and how might it affect healthcare delivery?

Certainly, if the healthcare.gov website is any indication, I would expect that the technology side of implementation of the new coding system is likely to be plagued with errors and inefficiencies.  Imagine developing software that will assist in billing and coding of numerous diagnoses for each patient–including “struck by a macaw” and “bitten by a sea lion” (yes, these actually exist).  ICD-10 will increase the number of available codes from 17K to more than 155K.  From a physician/provider standpoint, the coding process will likely bring efficiency and productivity to a slow crawl as the new codes are phased in.  In a survey conducted earlier last year, 90% of physicians expressed significant concern over the transition and nearly 75% anticipate a negative impact on their practice (both operationally and financially).  Practices and hospital systems will now require new employees (at a cost that ultimately will be passed on to the consumer) that are trained and expert in applying the new codes in order to keep up with government mandates.  Over the last year, physicians have been subjected to online courses and training in the new ICD-10 coding system–many leaving the classes more confused than when they began.

Ultimately, physicians will have to change the way in which they document office visits and procedures in order to ensure reimbursement.  Altogether, these changes are likely to make an overloaded system even more cumbersome.  As we have seen with Obamacare and other government related policy changes, more work is created, more inefficiencies are exposed—in the end, the patient will suffer.  Providers will become overwhelmed by even more government related paperwork and documentation requirements.  More time spent on coding Orca bites means less time in the exam room chatting with a patient.  My how medicine has changed….

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Exploring The Leadership Potential of Three Little Words: Applying “I Don’t Know” To Medicine

Recently I read an interesting article on leadership published at Inc.com.  Although most of the journal is focused on those in business, many of the pieces on leadership are very applicable to those of us in Medicine.  In this article author Curt Hanke writes about the inspiration and leadership positives found in the three simple words:  “I Don’t Know.”   On first blush, we may think that a leader speaking these words may no longer inspire confidence and may lose the support of his or her troops.  However, as Mr Hanke goes on to detail, the words “I Don’t Know” may provide inspiration and motivate teams to perform even better.

As physicians, we are leaders–we lead teams, we lead students and other trainees, and most importantly we lead patients.  There are times when we lead and guide patients and families on very challenging journeys through brutal, sometimes devastating diseases.  Often, being a good leader is the most important part of our job.  With leadership comes many responsibilities– and those whom we lead look to us to show confidence as we provide guidance in uncertain times.

As physicians are leadership roles are two fold:

1. We lead teams of caregivers with a common goal–the best outcome for our patients.  Our teams look to us for confident judgements during crisis (such as during a code blue) and guidance when making day to day clinical decisions.  Our teams are bright and capable.  Our team members are diverse both in training, ability and in education–nurses, physical therapists, pharmacists and other physicians–all working in concert to achieve clinical success.

2. We lead patients and families.  We are the experts in a complex field that is foreign to many–we are relied on as guides, as advisors as well as generals on the field of battle.  We must inspire confidence and show kindness at all times.  Our patients are often frightened and uncertain.  We must help them learn, grow and adapt to changing medical and clinical scenarios.

To lead in this way can be very challenging but is not terribly dissimilar from leading in the business world.  We must be prepared–with knowledge of disease and the best available therapies.  We must be aware of the strengths and weaknesses of each individual on our medical team (including our own) and we must be able to motivate those in very different roles to band together for common good.  We must lead patients and families with compassion–we must understand things from their perspective and apply their needs into the equations we use to make clinical decisions.  We must lead both groups with honesty.  We must be willing to say “I Don’t Know” when appropriate.

Then we must harness the power of “I Don’t Know” in four distinct ways (according to Mr Henke):

1. Creates Possibilities--As a leader, saying “I Don’t Know” in medicine, may create an opportunity to bond with patients, families and team members.  Having the courage to articulate your shortcomings as the leader may actually garner more respect and tighten bonds through your honesty.

2. Inspires Engagement–As a leader, saying “I Don’t Know” in medicine may provide opportunities for others to take center stage and bring forward ideas that they may have otherwise kept to themselves.  It allows others to think more creatively and inspires team members to find “ownership” in working to solve a particular clinical mystery or treatment problem.

3. Avoids Complacency–As a leader, saying “I Don’t Know” in medicine provides me with the motivation to learn more and to be better.  Not knowing the answer right away drives me to reflect on my particular skill set and take stock in what I can do better both as a leader and as a team member.  When the leader works to improve, it often inspires growth among team members as well.

4.  Inspires “Fun” During Difficult Times–As a leader, saying “I Don’t Know” rather than a positive effect on morale–A culture of “I Don’t Know” produces engaged team members and these engaged team members are more productive.  Ultimately a more productive medical team results in more positive patient outcomes.

Effective leadership is vital to success in both business and in medicine.  The most effective leaders know their own limitations and are not afraid to share that with the team that is inspired to follow them.  Courage to say “I Don’t Know” may be the difference in discovering the most accurate diagnosis and prescribing the most effective treatment plan for a patient and their family.  Be willing to admit when you fall short–as Socrates stated “The only true wisdom is in knowing [what] you don’t know”

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Underestimating The Impact of “Waiting for Godot” (and A Doctor’s Call)

In Samuel Beckett’s play, two vagrants pass the time of the day by waiting for another man named Godot–a person that they have never met.  The wait becomes intolerable at times and the men argue, philosophize and even go as far as to contemplate suicide in order to “pass the time.”  It is estimated that Americans spend roughly 37 billion hours waiting in lines each year.  Waiting in lines can have a negative emotional toll–just as in Beckett’s play–as we stand in line, many of us have a nagging sensation that our life is slipping away. Waiting can produce irritability, anger, anxiety, and boredom.

Unfortunately, healthcare is ubiquitous with waiting.  We wait for an appointment, we wait to be called to the exam room, we wait to hear the rattle in the door that signifies the arrival of the physician.  As patients, we all come to accept waiting as part of the ritual of medical care.  (and with the new Affordable Care Act I expect waiting will become even more commonplace).  However, some waits can be intolerable and can negatively affect our psyche–leading to sleeplessness, anxiety and even depression.  One of the biggest challenges facing healthcare providers is the ability to quickly and accurately disseminate tests results and information to patients.  Even in this era of electronic medical records, smartphones, twitter and facebook we still sometimes have to wait for an old fashioned phone call from our doctors.

This week in the New York Times, Dr. Mikkael Sekeres shares his own experience with waiting for news from a physician.   Dr Sekeres, an oncologist, often must return panicked phone calls from patients and families with serious diagnoses.  In his essay, Mikkael describes his emotions while waiting on his doctor to call him about an abnormal cardiac stress test.  As physicians, it is important that we read this piece and are able to understand the healing power of a simple phone call.  As with most things, the experience from the “other side” of the white coat is very different from what we may perceive about the patient experience.  Learning from our own experiences as patients will inevitably make us better caregivers in the end.

Today, physicians and other healthcare providers are asked to do more with less time.  With increasingly grueling inpatient and outpatient schedules, tasks such as returning phone calls often get delegated to others or pushed to the end of the day.  What may seem like a “low priority” activity to a busy physician may very well be a “game-changer” for the patient awaiting the buzz of his or her smartphone.  However, we must remember what is most important to a patient who is left waiting and worrying–information.  Information provides power and gives back control.  When we have information, we can start to make choices and begin to move forward.  Living in limbo is not a party–for many, limbo is purgatory.

Given the mandates for electronic records and e-prescribing, why can’t we come up with a HIPAA compliant way to allow patients immediate access to test results?  This is a very difficult question to ponder.  There is no easy answer.  Doctors are not reimbursed for this type of work and yet physicians must justify every minute of their existence to the “bean counters” that follow them around electronically.  Assistants often answer patient calls for healthcare providers and are often ill-equipped to handle the questions that may arise when providing results or other medical information.  Many patients and practices have systems in place that allow a patient to log on to a secure website and look up results–however, how does the average patient interpret these results?  Will this create even more anxiety and worry?  There is no replacement for the doctor’s call–some situations must be handled by either a face to face visit or a personal phone call.  We must remember to imagine what waiting in purgatory must be like for our patients and make it a priority to provide timely results and information in order to ease their pain.  Even if Godot never shows his face…

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Healthcare Law Rollout “Delays”: Primum Non Nocere

Recently, President Obama’s healthcare law has been met with more challenges and “delays” than when it was rapidly pushed through Congress during his first term.  Many critics of the legislation argued that the rush to produce a product (predictably in time for the re-election campaign) would result in poorly thought out, overly-complex law that would be nearly impossible to understand and implement.  Four years ago, there was insufficient infrastructure at both the Federal and State levels to roll out such a piece of legislation–not surprisingly, things are no different today.  Rather than focusing on preparing for the implementation of sweeping reform, court battles have been fought, billions of tax dollars spent and complex decisions have been rendered by the Supreme Court.

Now, we are beginning to see that many of these critic’s concerns were in fact quite valid.  A few weeks ago, it was announced that the Obama administration would “delay” until 2015 the mandate that business provide healthcare insurance or pay a fine.  As I recall, this was one of the cornerstones of the healthcare law–statements from the White House indicate that it was “delayed” because there was insufficient infrastructure to provide more than one choice of insurance in the October premier of the Healthcare marketplace–the law promised multiple choices for small businesses. (surprised? C’mon,not really)

Today, the New York Times reported that yet another provision in the healthcare law is going to be “delayed” due to the fact that those that must comply need “more time”.  Interestingly, this provision was another one of Obama’s cornerstone promises–there will be limits set for individual out of pocket expenses.  Today, buried deep within other unrelated legislation, it was discovered that this particular consumer protection provision has been “delayed” until 2015 due to the fact that the poor, over-burdened insurance companies need “more time” to work on readying their computer systems to handle these particular co-pay limits.  (yea, right).  In my experience, insurance companies seem to be able to deny claims and disapprove treatments, drugs and procedures for my patients at an alarmingly quick pace.  It’s all a matter of priorities I guess.

What’s my take on all of this?  It’s the patient (or potential patient) that ultimately suffers….

The government and the healthcare law is playing favorites.  The law was supposedly passed in order to protect the individual American from escalating healthcare costs.  The law was created to provide affordable, sustainable healthcare to every American citizen.  The law was created in order to ensure quality care and contain costs.  All of these goals are extremely important and certainly worthy of our nation’s leaders time, resources and focus.  However, as is often the case in politics, much of this law is about partisan politics, re-election aspirations, campaign support and legacy. Forgotten in the midst of all of the debate is the patient.  The patient is the reason healthcare exists in the first place.  The patient is the reason most physicians and other healthcare providers go to work early each day.  In the latest “delay” in the healthcare law, consumers (and hence, the patient) will now have no protection from insurance company charges and co-pays.  By allowing the out of pocket limits to go unenforced, the Obama administration and Congress are effectively providing the insurance companies with a license to charge as much as they can–make as much profit as they can–until the legislated limits are actually enforced.  Many potential patients may not seek care because of the burden of cost.  Many of these patients will suffer with devastating but curable disease.  Many will die.

That’s capitalism right?  But should it be allowed to function at the expense of human lives?

For too long, the debate over healthcare costs and reform has centered around physicians, physician payments and hospital costs.  Isn’t it time we considered holding insurers responsible for years of abuse?–charges to consumers for insurance are far in excess to claims paid.  Most insurance companies that I deal with on behalf of my patients have lots of people trained to “deny” requested medically indicated treatments and procedures.  It is time for government to step up and advocate for the patient.  We must hold all players accountable for healthcare reform–physicians, hospitals, lawyers as well as insurers.  Lets stop playing favorites.  Lets focus on the patient.  Primum non nocere should apply to government, insurance companies, lawyers as well as physicians.  Primum non nocere…Primum non nocere…

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Considering A Divorce From Your Doctor? Here’s What You Need to Know

Just As in marriage, the ability to communicate is essential to any successful doctor-patient relationship.  In fact, the most successful doctor-patient relationships are a lot like a marriage.  Both parties must be willing to listen, to negotiate and to support each other’s decisions.  As I have stated in many previous blogs, outcomes improve significantly when patients are engaged in their own healthcare.  Engagement only occurs when doctors and patients are able to effectively work together to solve health problems.  The days of the paternalistic physician dictating lifestyle changes and treatment plans are long over.  Today, patients are better informed and armed with information as they enter the office for consultation.

Unfortunately, just as in marriage, not all doctor-patient relationships work out.  Sometimes changes have to be made in the spirit of moving forward with effective healthcare. This week in the Wall Street Journal, author Kristen Gerencher addressed the issue of “When to fire your Doctor”.  In this piece Ms Gerencher provides sound advice on how to determine when it is time for a change.  She mentions 5 warning signs that may indicate that a divorce and remarriage to another provider is important.  In particular, if you feel worse when you leave your physician’s office than when you arrived, it may be time to consider a change.

Here’s my take on the warning signs that the WSJ mentions:  (the warning signs listed are directly from the WSJ article, the commentary below each one is mine)

1. You leave with more questions than answers.  

It is critical that physicians take the time to communicate clearly to patients.  Essential to this communication is allowing time for questions AND clarifying any misunderstandings or addressing concerns about a treatment plan.  This can be challenging for doctors in the current healthcare environment where federally mandated documentation requirements and pressures to see more patients in less time are limiting the time once dedicated to patient discussion.  However, it is essential to the health of the doctor patient relationship that physicians do not allow these conversations to be pushed aside.  Remember, patient engagement is key.  An informed patient is much more likely to be engaged.

2. Your doctor dismisses your input.

In the age of the internet, patients often come armed with lots of information (lots of which is unreliable and shady at best) that is obtained from online searches.  Rather than simply dismiss the information as junk, it is important to guide our patients to more reliable and more accurate sources of internet information such as MedPage Today and other good patient friendly information sites.

3. Your doctor has misdiagnosed you.

Medicine is not a perfect science.  It is important that you work with your doctor every step of the way along your path to diagnosis.  Mistakes in diagnosis happen–however, these mistakes are not always negligence.  Consider if your physician has carefully considered your problem and has provided a well thought out differential diagnosis before leaving due to a misdiagnosis.  It is important that communication continues during the process of misdiagnosis.  If there is no good communication at this stage, it may be time to choose another provider.

4. Your doctor balks at a second opinion

A good physician is never afraid of a second opinion.  In fact, I often welcome a second opinion in cases where there are multiple choices of a plan of action.  It is essential that patients feel comfortable with their treatment plan–a feeling of comfort breeds engagement and engagement is key for success.  As physicians, we must be willing to put our egos aside in order to provide the best possible care for our patients.

5. Your doctor isn’t board certified.

When choosing a physician, it is vital that you examine his or her background and training.  Typically, doctors must complete a course of training in residency and fellowship in order to be boarded in a particular specialty.  Board exams (some written and some oral) must be passed and competency must be proven.  Once certified, physicians must maintain competency through continuing medical education and re-certification every 10 years.  If your doctor is not board certified, it is not necessarily the end–ask why.  There are several reasons that they may not be including overseas training that is not recognized in the US by the US societies responsible for board certification.

Choosing a doctor is a lot like choosing a spouse.  Decisions should be made in cooperation with one another and both sides must contribute to planning and execution of the chosen course of action.  Patients must weigh options, consider pros and cons and discuss issues with their provider and the provider’s staff when unhappy with a particular physician or physician group.  IF communication is not productive and there is no engagement, patients must make a change.  Good healthcare is a two way street.  Doctor and patient must work in concert in order to achieve optimal outcomes.

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