Tag Archives: blogging

Connectivity, Email and Stress: Finding the Proper Balance for Success

Well, here I am.  Again.  On vacation and connected to the internet.  I must admit, I am addicted.  Twitter, blogging, and email.  I cannot seem to just let it go–not even for a week.  Email, in particular, seems to have taken a dominating role in all of our lives.  Constant hip checks for email downloads to our iphones have become an obsession.  As we speak, I am on a beautiful 4 hour train ride from Edinburgh to London (the same route that Harry Potter and his friends take from Hogwarts, no less).

This week on the website Inc.com, I came across an interesting article that explores the ways in which email is ruining our health.  A group of UK researchers decided to examine the effect of email on a group of workers.  Objective measures such as blood pressure, heart rate and cortisol levels were measured and the workers also kept a log of their work activities during the study period.  Results of the study indicated that a single email was no more stressful than taking a single phone call–however, an inbox full of a large amount of email produced a powerful stress reaction with elevations in cortisol, heart rate and blood pressure.  Interestingly, the study did find that the type of email received had a significant effect on stress.  Email that was received about current activities and contained time relevant information as well as emails that congratulated a “job well done” were not at all stressful.  in contrast, emails that were completely irrelevant and interrupted tasks were incredibly stressful and levels of cortisol, blood pressure and heart rate all spiked.  The lead researcher, Dr Tom Jackson, concluded that the email itself is not the issue–it is how the email is used that causes the problems with increased stress.  We are managing email in the  midst of phone calls, family time, and other in person meetings.  Often, responding to and filtering through email can be a distractor and take us away from more important tasks. Hence–email is stressing us all out.

As I mentioned, I am currently on “holiday” in the United Kingdom with my family.  I have tried very hard not to use email but I have failed miserably.  For me, the act of checking email twice a day has lowered my levels of anxiety about work.  However, when I stumbled upon certain email messages my levels of stress began to spike.  These were often emails that I could  do nothing about until I return to the states.  (As with most folks, feelings of loss of control and the inability to respond also create elevated levels of stress).  Luckily, I have my family with me on our tour through the UK to set me straight–instead of fretting over the emails and how to handle them, I was “convinced” to take a walk to Edinburgh castle and enjoyed a nice day in the sun (It may have been the only sunny day in Scotland this year).  My family and I had a wonderful day together in the castle.

I think that, in reality, one must find a balance between connectivity and relaxation.  For each person this balance is going to be different and based on individual personality traits.  I enjoy blogging and it is a very relaxing, stress reducing activity for me.  As I have mentioned in a previous blog, writing allows me to process my thoughts and share my feelings.  (Hence this blog is being written over the course of a four hour train ride).  For others, a completely disconnected holiday is the best course.  Whatever it may be, find your own balance.  Understand that email is an important tool for productivity and that it can be abused.  For me, I am learning what types of emails tend to elevate my own cortisol levels and will attempt to avoid these emails on future vacations.  Life work balance is essential to success and longevity–finding your own balance with email and connectivity is a critical component to this process.  With that, I am going to sign off and stare out the window at the beautiful Scottish wind blown sheep.

Photo on 6-12-13 at 6.24 AM

The Blogging Patient and Cyberspace: Unlimited Possibilities for Improving Health and Battling Disease

Social media has opened a whole new world for patients.  Now, information about disease is readily accessible and available to everyone.  Certainly, there are issues with reliability and accuracy of internet sources and this can create uneasiness and misunderstanding for both physician and patient.  However, the internet can also provide many new therapeutic possibilities.  In particular, online support groups, twitter chats and blogging can provide a positive outlet for patients suffering with disease.  Today, I want to focus on one of these internet opportunities–the patient blog.  Recently, a online article on iHealth Beat explored this concept  of patient blogging and its benefits.

Just as commonly experienced in the climax and resolution phase of Greek tragedy, writing a blog about one’s experience as a patient can be cathartic.  Patients with chronic illnesses or with a new diagnosis are often confused, frightened and angry.  Numerous studies in the psychiatry literature have demonstrated that journaling or writing about one’s feelings and experiences can have a very positive effect on emotional health.  Journaling has been shown to have several other unexpected benefits as well.  In the age of the internet and social media, journaling is now called blogging.  Blogging can be a private posting (where only you  or those you approve can see) or can be made public for anyone to see.

Blogging can have many benefits that are very similar to journaling.   From a pure neuro-biological standpoint, while you are occupied with writing, the analytical left brain is engaged in the writing process.  This allows the right brain to be free to feel, emote and create.  In this setting, you are able to better understand yourself and the world around you.  Specifically, there are four distinct benefits that patients can receive from blogging that I believe are worth mentioning:

1. Blogging helps to clarify thoughts and feelings:  Often writing down our feelings provides a way for us to better organize our thoughts.  Blogging can help patients with terminal illnesses better understand their disease and how they are reacting or adjusting to the challenges of the diagnosis and/or therapy.

2. Blogging helps you to get to know yourself better:  Writing routinely will help you better understand what makes you happy and content.  Conversely, writing will also help you better understand what people and situations upset you.  This can be incredibly important when battling chronic disease.  It is important that you are able to spend more time doing the things that make you happy and are able to identify and avoid things that are upsetting.

3. Blogging helps you to reduce stress:  Patients who receive a diagnosis of a major illness or who suffer daily with the challenges of chronic disease often have a great deal of anger and resentment.  It is human nature to ask questions such as “why me?”.  Blogging about angry feelings can be a positive and therapeutic release of emotion.  It allows for the writer to return from the blog more centered and better equipped to deal with negative emotion

4. Blogging helps unlock your creativity:  Often we approach problem solving from a purely left brain analytical perspective.  This is how we are taught throughout our education to attack problems in math and science in school.  However, some problems are only solved through creativity and through the use of a more right brain approach.  Writing allows the right brain to creatively attack problems while the analytical side of the brain is occupied with the mechanics of the writing process.

I believe that blogging can be just as important as medication compliance in patients with chronic disease.  The diagnosis of a chronic disease can produce a great deal of stress and emotional angst.  Patients who are able to deal with negative feelings and emotions in a more positive way are better suited to tackling their health problems.  As mentioned above, blogging has many benefits on our emotional health.  By dealing with negative emotions and unlocking creativity, we are better able to deal with the realities of chronic disease and more effectively interact with friends and loved ones.  I encourage everyone–patient, physician, family member or friend–to begin to blog.  I expect that the health benefits of writing will be well worth the time in front of the computer screen and the insights that you may discover about yourself may be be life changing.


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