Monthly Archives: September 2014

Should We All Die at 75?: Addressing the “Emanuel Principe” in Obamacare

Ezekiel Emanuel, one of the authors of the Affordable Care Act spoke publicly this week about his own desire to “die at 75” in a article published in the Atlantic.  In his piece, he argues that as he ages, he wishes to stop all preventative medical measures and “let nature take its course” as he approaches the age of 75.  This includes screenings such as colonoscopy as well as taking flu shots for the prevention of communicable illness.  While currently in excellent health, Mr Emanuel believes that while death is a loss–”living too long is also a loss.” He argues that the American obsession with living longer results in a larger number of elderly, disabled citizens.  I take significant issue with this position and fear that this is simply the beginning of a new phase in the ACA debate–the rationing of care. From the outset, many of us in healthcare and scholars of healthcare policy have seen Obamacare as a way to promote the rationing healthcare (particularly for the elderly).  While the administration has vehemently denied these claims throughout the legislative and implementation phases of the new healthcare law, it is particularly revealing that one of the principal architects of the law firmly believes that we should not pay attention to life expectancy statistics beyond the age of 75.  Medical advances have made it increasingly possible for seniors to lead healthy, productive exciting lives well into their 80s.  Now, I certainly am not arguing for providing futile care in the setting of terminal illness but–Why then should government (instead of doctors) now have the right to determine how healthcare resources are utilized and who gets what?  Is it all about age?  Do we value the young more than the more “seasoned” citizens? The US healthcare system, while certainly imperfect, offers some of the greatest technological advances in the world and the most significant thing that has always set US healthcare apart form others has been CHOICE.  With Obamacare in place, we now have less choice in our healthcare and very little improvement in access.  This latest article by Mr Emmanuel is no surprise–he has been clear about his belief in allocating health care dollars away from activities which may extend lifespans for Americans.  While, Mr Emmanuel certainly has the RIGHT to refuse care for himself at a certain age neither he (NOR OBAMA or any GOVERNMENT agent) should be able to determine an “acceptable” life span for each of us. Quality of life and health status can be very subjective and care must remain individualized rather than mandated (or withheld) based on actuarial tables or government rationing of resources. Medicine is all about innovation and the development of new technologies.  Through technology we are able to provide longer, more productive lives for our patients.  Our patients are able to retire from a life of work and enjoy spouses, family and friends–well into their 80s and 90s WITH a quality of life.  In fact one of my favorite “golf buddies” is 80 years old and going strong–He can still shoot in the 80s from time to time and never misses a game. In MEDICINE one size does not fit all.  OBAMACARE wants to force a ONE SIZE FITS ALL healthcare system on all of us and as a physician I find this to be unacceptable.  Just as we must cater therapy to individual patients—when (and how) you die must also be catered to each individual patients needs, desires and beliefs. Chronological age such as 75 may be different for different people AND we must respect individual needs.  Medicine is a clearly a science but in many cases the practice of medicine –particularly when making decisions about end of life issues–makes it more of an ART.  The government has no place in dictating ART.  Government should help to preserve and curate art–not regulate and mandate the way in which medical care is delivered to individual patients based on age. Ultimately, left to its own devices, I believe that the ACA will create rationing of care for Americans and we will have two classes of people–those that are wealthy and can afford private care and can pay cash for it–these can make their own healthcare decisions and decide when enough is enough.  The others–most of us–will be lumped into the disaster that IS obamacare and will have little or no choice in how our healthcare is delivered.  Waiting lists for advanced procedures and denials of advanced care for the elderly will be the standard–Just as Mr Emanuel envisioned it when he crafted the law just a few short years ago.

Unknown

Engaging Patients with an Apple and Health Apps: Watches Are No Longer Just for Telling Time

Today patients are increasingly connected.  The fastest growing demographic on Twitter is actually those that are between 45 and 65 years old.  Our patients are becoming better informed and are flocking to the internet and to social media to discuss and learn more about disease.  Prevention of disease is becoming more of a priority in our healthcare system as we begin to adjust to the mandates provided for in the Affordable Care Act and physicians are now expecting patients to take a more active role in their healthcare.  In the last 5 years, the concept of the electronic patient has emerged and is becoming more and more prevalent among mainstream patient populations.  These patients often come to office visits armed with information and data collected on the internet and are very technologically savvy.  They embrace new devices and are eager to track health indicators such as blood sugar, blood pressure and heart rate through easy to use phone applications.

This week, Apple intends to announce a new smartwatch and a group of associated health applications.  These innovations will further allow the electronic patient to become more of a mainstream phenomenon.  However, in order to be effective, physicians and other healthcare providers must embrace these technologies and begin to better understand their utility in all patient populations.  According to the Wall Street Journal, the announcement of the new smartwatch is expected to introduce no less than ten new sensors for monitoring health indicators.  Apple has created a data repository that will allow health related information to be stored (with the user’s permission) and directed to healthcare providers if so desired.  This assimilation and collection of massive amounts of health indicator data may be a significant game changer in the fight against chronic disease.  With many patients, compliance with medication or lifestyle modification plans is a challenge.  Many diseases such as hypertension do not produce immediate ill health effects–rather they accumulate over time.  However, if we can clearly demonstrate to patients the positive responses to interventions on a daily (or even hourly basis) they may be much more likely to comply with prescribed treatment plans.  Glancing at a smartwatch and noting a response to exercise or to a completed dose of medication can be a powerful motivational tool.

What if all of the data is collected simply by wearing a watch?

If we make collection and organization of information simple and user friendly, then important information can be transmitted to a physician who can review the data prior to the next face to face office encounter.  Real time feedback can then be provided to the patient and this may ultimately result in increased engagement and may actually spur change in habits or behaviors that are detrimental to a particular patient’s health.  Moreover, according to the WSJ, the new Apple operating system will include a Health icon that will allow for the development of a dashboard with many health indicators that are easily accessible in one place–lab results, heart rate, blood pressure, weight–even calories consumed and burned in a given time period.  The engaged patient can see what they are doing right, what they are doing wrong and can track improvements in habits rather quickly.  Having the data all in one place will likely increase compliance and improve overall health of the adopters of this technology.

What about security of sensitive personal healthcare data?

As with most new advances in medicine, there are significant concerns about data breaches and compliance with the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations.  According to a story in the New York Times, Apple is working with application developers as well as the federal government in order to ensure that any stored or tracked healthcare data will remain secure.  Partnerships with application designers, insurance companies, healthcare systems and physicians will be critical to the success of the new Apple smartwatch.  As these new technologies are rolled out and continue to develop, efforts to secure data will continue to evolve.

The development of new and exciting healthcare technologies and applications will continue to bolster the development and of the growing number of electronic patients.  Ultimately, the Apple smartwatch and other soon to be developed health indicator monitors, trackers and data repositories will only serve to further engage both patients and doctors and, in my opinion, significantly improve our ability to intervene EARLY and prevent the terrible consequences of chronic disease.

apple