Finding Success AND Happiness in Medicine? Where Is The Holy Grail?

Medicine is a very rewarding career.  However, recent changes in the healthcare system have made the practice of business much more cumbersome and job satisfaction rates among physicians is at an all time low.  Fear over the unknown and how Obamacare may affect our ability to effectively and efficiently care for out patients has significantly contributed to the general unease in the medical community.  Most physicians are highly driven, highly successful individuals.  Much of my professional happiness (and I expect other healthcare providers feel the same way) is derived from developing relationships with my patients and achieving excellent clinical outcomes.  However, balancing success and happiness in medicine is now more challenging than ever.  More time is now devoted to additional government mandated paperwork, arguing with insurers and managing escalating overhead costs.  All told, these tasks begin to take away time normally devoted to patient care.

This week, in the online magazine Inc.com, I read an article discussing tips for ensuring BOTH happiness and success.  As I read through the piece, I began to reflect on my own balance of success and happiness–How can these two goals can be readily achieved TOGETHER?  Although primarily directed at the executive/business professional, much of the content is very applicable to medicine.  In today’s medical landscape, the most successful physicians have embraced the concept of the Physician Executive–developing a business skill set that allows one to be fastidious with a spreadsheet while also providing exceptional patient care.  I have addressed this concept in several previous blogs–now more than ever, it is critical for physicians to think like business people in order to navigate the changes that are being implemented on a daily basis.  Although much of our new executive-like tasks certainly take time away from patients, if we are able to find the right balance we can still find happiness and fulfillment in our jobs.  As stated in the Inc.com piece, in order to achieve both goals we must think in unique ways–try to do things differently and find out work works best for YOU.

In the article, author Steve Tobak explores six unique ways that one can develop BOTH a successful career and enjoy a happy life–believe it or not, they do not have to be mutually exclusive.  Here is my take on how each of these suggestions (that were created by Mr Tobak) can apply to those of us who have made our careers in medicine and healthcare:

1. Develop real relationships:  In the end, relationships matter.  In medicine, the most important relationship is that with our patients.  Understanding patients feelings, their families and their preferences improves our ability to care for them.  Celebrating their successes and their family milestones provides me with great happiness.

2. Groom yourself:  No, I don’t mean comb your hair–Try new things.  Engage in other activities as time allows.  Make sure that you make time for family outings and that you try skydiving–or horseback riding–whatever it is that interests you–give it a whirl.  It may change the way you look at your work and your life.  Ultimately, exposure to new things can make us all better leaders and provide more opportunities for success at work.

3. Do Nothing:  Medicine can be incredibly hectic.  Running between hospitals and clinics.  Hustling to see a new consult or dictate another note–all of this “noise” can take away from happiness.  Every single day, just take a few minutes to do nothing.  Sit quietly and listen to your own thoughts…meditate.  Even a brief respite can make you more effective and ultimately improve your mood.

4. Work for a great company:  Whether you own your own practice (a rarity in today’s medical world) or work for a university or hospital, make sure you believe in the mission of the organization.  Be involved and try to influence policy.  If you work in an organization that recognizes and appreciates your efforts, your job satisfaction will improve.  If you do not, you may need to consider taking a risk and making a change.

5. Do one thing at a time:  This seems like an impossibility for physicians today (guilty as charged).  However, if you are able to make a list and prioritize–focus on one or two tasks at a time–you will see the fruits of your labor.  Crossing a task off the list gives us a feeling of accomplishment and completion which can add to overall happiness and satisfaction.  Trying to chip away at several things at once can often result in no task done well.  In medicine, it may be that you spend a half day a week on administrative work–take time to separate yourself from clinical work and catch up on the rest.

6.  Be good to yourself:  As physicians we expect nothing but the best out of ourselves–we are often very critical of our own decisions and clinical outcomes.  In the current healthcare market  (world of Obamacare reform) there is much we cannot control.  We must remember to remain centered and remain “in the present” in order to achieve happiness.  Although providing perfect care is a noble goal–it is not attainable.  Be reasonable with expectations–always provide the very best of yourself to your patients and be satisfied with the fact that you do.

Happiness is critical to a successful and fulfilling career.  With sweeping changes in healthcare, many physicians are finding it more difficult to balance both success and happiness.  By applying these 6 unique principles and looking at the “big picture” it is my hope that all of us can continue to serve our patients, continue productive successful careers and remain satisfied and happy throughout our professional and personal lives.  If we are able to achieve the right balance then everyone–patients, family and YOU–will ultimately reap the benefits of a long and HAPPY career in healthcare.

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